Historical Truths are Passed Down by Oral Tradition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Let Me Through”

-Words by unknown,  Arranged by Motoori Nagayo

Let me through, let me through.

What is this narrow path lead to?

This is the one for Tenjin to pass along.

Please let me through.

I won’t let you if you don’t have anything to do.

I’m going to a shrine to return my Ofuda in cerebration of my daughter’s seventh birthday.

It’s very good to use this path when you go, but it’s scary when you come back.

I’m scared, but please let me through.

 

Motoori Norinaga(本居宣長)was an eminent Japanese classical scholar in Edo period, but he was also a unparalleld theosophist and a great Ise-Shitoist. The children’s song Let Me Through has been handed down all over Japan through the ages. Interestingly, the meaning of its original words had been vague and the melody had never been made uniform before Motoori Nagayo(本居長世), the sixth descendant of Motoori Norinaga, selected it from a number of children’s songs, adapted the song into a musical score, arranged and spread it.

  • eminent 高名な
  • scholar 学者
  • theosophist 霊学者
  • hand down A  Aを伝える
  • vague 不明瞭な
  • descendant 子孫

“It’s very good to use this path when you go, but it’s scary when you come back” feels like the very process where souls come into the world. You came into this world anxious to be born, but once you did, you end up living your life afraid of death. This song is a description of the process where God sends souls to this world, suggesting that everyone has some mission from God. Though Tenjin(天神) refers to Sugawara Michizane(菅原道真)generally, but spiritually, it refers to Susanoo(スサノオ), the holy spirit that controls life and death of human beings. Nursery songs and folk tales often contain something spiritually deep.

  • process 過程
  • anxious to~ 〜したくて仕方がない
  • description 描写
  • mission 使命
  • refer to A  Aを指す
  • folk tale 民間伝承

Speaking of folk tales, a folklorist, a Japanese literature scholar, and a poet Origuchi Shinobu(折口信夫) concluded after walking and researching all over Japan that historical truths are passed from generation to generation orally. Therefore he suggested that documents should be doubted. His study, called Origuchi Gaku(折口学),  included Shinto studies, the history of arts and Japanese linguistics as well as ethnology and Japanese literature.

  • speaking of A Aと言えば
  • orally 口で
  • doubt 疑う
  • ethnology 民俗学
  • include 含める

Here are a few examples of his interesting views. One of his coind words is Marebito(稀人・稀客・客神) , which reffers to gods visiting this world from antient times. Another is Yorishiro(依代・招代), which refers to things on which gods and spirits descend. Also he defined Emperor as the man possessed with Tennou Rei(天皇霊), the spirit of Emperor.

  • coin 造り出す
  • descend 降臨する
  • define A as B AをBと定義する
  • possess 憑依する

Having Studied Ethnology thoroughly, he derived the two important concepts: Marebito, an idea of holy spirits, and Yorishiro, a secret of practical, occult psychical research. These concepts basically coincide with the secret ceremony I was told by a holy spirit. It’s something extremely rare that Origuchi could grasp the spirit world correctly from his academic point of view. Truth being singular, it may be a matter of course.

  • thoroughly 徹底的に
  • derive 引き出す
  • psychical 心霊の
  • coinside 一致する
  • grasp 把握する
  • sigular 一つだけの

生かして頂いて ありがとう御座位ます

I Ka Shi Te I Ta Da I Te  A Ri Ga To U Go Za I Ma Su

Thank you so much for keeping me/us alive.

Once Your Mind Goes Out of Control, It’s Difficult to Stop It.

天津 神様

Once you begin to worry about the future, it’s likely that you cannot stop worrying and begin to suffer, though you haven’t been in any bad situation yet. Even in such a situation, you would manage to get over it. Time goes on with everything changing, like getting  new information, meeting new people or beginning to read this blog etc. Therefore, your state of mind you expected before will be different. The proverb “Fear is often worse than the danger itself” is true.  You may be most distressed before something bad happens to you.

  • likely ありそうな
  • manage to~ なんとか〜する
  • get over A Aを乗り越える
  • fear 恐怖
  • danger 危険
  • distressed 苦しい

When you become mentally ill, you will come to lose you cheerfulness in your expression. It’s important to look at your face in the mirror. Look inside yourself, not just looking at your appearance so that you can check your state of mind. Look at your eyes, and you know it. When you think “Oh, my face is awful today,” it’s important for you to try not to get angry or worried that day. Once human minds get out of control, they become difficult to control.

  • cheerfulness  明るさ
  • state 状態
  • once S+V いったんSがVすると

In such a case, from a spiritual point of view, spirits similar to you in spiritual wave are coming near and as the result, your worries will grow larger in your mind. To prevent this, it’s effective to remind yourself of gratitude to your ancestors. In the World of Reality, making efforts is important in everything. As for the prevention of mental illness, you should do something about it, not leave it as it is. Anyway, it’s important for you to try to recall gratitude in everyday life.

  • point of view 観点
  • similar 似ている
  • prevent 防ぐ
  • effective 効果がある
  • gratitude 感謝
  • ancestor 先祖

Mr. Munetada Kurozumi(黒住宗忠), a shintoist in Edo period, cherished and raised his Inner God and succeeded in turning it into Amaterasu-oho-mi-kami(天照太御神)while he was alive. He was always happy with a smile together with Amaterasu-oho-mi-kami. According to a famous anecdote about him,  every time he was said by an religious man “Your face is that of a stupid,” he was delighted thinking “Oh, my faith practice is doing well.” A relaxed facial expression raising no suspicion, not a serious one,  is the proof that the person’s mind is flexible. It’s very good as the proverb says “Soft methods often get the better of brute force.”

  • cherish 大事にする
  • raise 育てる
  • succeed in ~ing 〜することに成功する
  • turn A into B AをBに変える
  • anecdote 逸話
  • every time S+V SがVするたびに
  • stupid 愚か者
  • be delighted 喜ぶ
  • suspicion 疑い
  • proof 証拠
  • get the better of A Aを打ち負かす

You’re not beautiful? No problem. Take good care about your beauty from within. People who hate themselves(=God)are often ugly both in appearance and character.

  • beauty 美しさ
  • ugly 醜い
  • appearance 容姿
  • character 性格

生かして頂いて ありがとう御座位ます

I Ka Shi Te I Ta Da I Te    A Ri Ga To U Go Za I Ma Su

Thank you so much for keeping us alive.

A Trip In Ancient Times That You Can Touch The Breath Of God

廃墟の中の鳥居

Until around Edo period, when there was almost no convenient means of transportation, to visit Ise(伊勢)was a great journey like a dream, once in a lifetime. If a visitor ran out of money on the way to Ise, he worked at the local place for money and kept on going. If a man who took a couple of years to visit Ise came back to his village, he and another man who had the same experience were bound to each other with a close friendship as Ise-tomo, or Ise-friend(伊勢友).

  • means 手段
  • transportation 交通
  • run out of A Aがなくなる
  • on the way 途中で
  • local 地元の
  • be bound 結ばれる

In ancient times before Ise Grand Shrine(伊勢神宮) was established, there was a folk custom of making a round trip among Mt.Hakusan(白山)in Ishikawa prefecture, the current place of Geku(外宮) of Ise Grand Shrine and Izougu(伊雑宮). This is the origin of worship of the sun aware of solar orbit. I feel people in ancient times used to repeat this round trip.

  • ancient times 古代
  • establish 創設する
  • folk custom 民俗習慣
  • round trip 往復
  • current 現在の
  • origin 起源
  • worship 崇拝
  • aware 意識した
  • solar orbit 太陽軌道

●Mt.Hakusan … the hidden Hakusan dynasty and the Original God worshipped there.

●Izougu and the place of Geku … one stone pillar out of three of the Hakusan dynasty was buried at Geku and another was taken to Mu, a floating island in the Pacific, and when Mu sank into the depths of the sea it was taken to where the current Isobecho(磯部町)exists and became the origin of Izougu.

  • dynasty 王朝
  • the Original God 根源神
  • bury 埋める
  • Mu ムー大陸
  • island 島
  • the Pacific 太平洋
  • sink 沈む

To visit these places, Mt. Hakusan, Ise and Isobe, causes the rebirth and rebinding of human souls. Once Ise Grand Shrine was established, only Ise was emphasized and Hakusan worship was hidden and disappeared from the center stage of history. But the oral tradition was handed down among people and a lot of Hakusan shrines were constructed all over Japan and visiting a Hakusan shrine and Ise was regarded as the same as visiting Mt.Hakusan and Ise. This is a historical secret of the reason why so many Hakusan shrines exist all over Japan.

  • cause 引き起こす
  • rebirth 再生
  • rebinding くくり直し
  • once S+V いったんSがVすると
  • emphasize 強調する
  • hand down A Aを伝える
  • construct 建設する
  • regard A as B AをBと見なす

The original, right way of worship service was to make round trips between Mt.Hakusan and Ise. I think that many of the people lived long who had a lot of chances to make round trips between Hukui(福井), where Mt. Hakusan lies, and Ise, such as Mr. Kiyoshi Hiraizumi(平泉澄), who was the chief priest of Heisenji-Hakusan shrine(平泉寺白山神社) and a scholar as well. This is not a coincidence. It is here in Japan that the miraculous points of the negative and the positive exist, the round trip between which enables human genes to improve. You can never experience the kind of trip abroad that you can touch the breath of God.

  • chief priest 神官
  • scholar 学者
  • coincidence 偶然の一致
  • the negative and the positive 陰と陽
  • enable A to~ Aが〜するのを可能にする
  • gene 遺伝子
  • improve 改善する
  • breath 息吹

生かして頂いて ありがとう御座位ます

I KA SHI TE I TA DA I TE    A RI GA TO U GO ZA I MA SU

Thank you so much for keeping us alive.